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Messages from 153050

Article: 153050
Subject: Re: RTOS with support for TCP/IP sockets on Spartan 3E
From: Julius <juliusbaxter@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 02:25:02 -0800 (PST)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Nov 22, 3:52=A0pm, "pascal_sweden"
<pascal_sweden@n_o_s_p_a_m.hotmail.com> wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I like to design a prototype network application on a Spartan 3E board,
> and would need to have an RTOS with support for TCP/IP sockets.
>
> Which soft core processor and RTOS would be recommendable to use on Spart=
an
> 3E board, to have access to TCP/IP sockets that direct to the Ethernet po=
rt
> on the Spartan 3E board?

There's several RTOSes supported for OpenRISC, and a few SoC projects
on OpenCores which have support for some commodity Spartan 3 boards
that could get you up and running quite quickly. I believe there's a
port of lwIP floating around for OpenRISC, too.

> Does the soft core processor come with a compiler for writing software in
> C?

It sure does.

http://opencores.org/or1k

Article: 153051
Subject: Re: Patent Reform Town Hall Meeting (Balt/Washington Area IEEE Consultants Network)
From: eric.jacobsen@ieee.org (Eric Jacobsen)
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 17:27:03 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Rick and all,

Ran across this the other day and thought it might be useful.   I
haven't had a chance to go through much of the material (because
there's a lot!), but it looks to be along the same lines as what you
had pulled together.

Presentation materials are available in the links as well.

http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/seminars/AIA-seminar/default.asp


On Sat, 5 Nov 2011 16:46:03 -0700 (PDT), rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com>
wrote:

>You guys missed a really great discussion today.  We had to expert
>presenters and two representatives from the Patent Office.  They
>discussed a lot of issues that have been raised here.  I only wish I
>had taken better notes.  I did get the chance to speak directly with
>Dr Lee Hollaar who spoke of several ways to deep six a patent.  One is
>to file (free) with the patent office a notice of a publication which
>would represent prior art.  This is attached at an application or even
>a granted patent.  If the patent holder tries to enforce the patent by
>filing suit in court the lawyer would be guilty of filing not in good
>faith or some such legal term and would be in deep sneakers with the
>court.  There were other things that can be done and they don't
>require you to be a lawyer or use one.
>
>I was very impressed with the knowledge of the presenters as well as
>the USPTO representatives.  Probably the most useful thing that was
>said was that there are many views of the new law but it is the law.
>Those who are most aware of it and use it are the ones who will most
>profit.  Getting an attitude about it accomplishes nothing.
>
>BTW, many of the provisions don't take effect for over a year.  So it
>is just like an election, file early and file often!
>
>Rick
>
>
>On Oct 24, 3:59=A0pm, rickman <gnu...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Co-sponsored by
>> IEEE NCA Consultants Network,
>> Baltimore Consultants Network,
>> Society on Social Implications of Technology,
>> Baltimore and NoVA/Wash. Computer Society,
>> and Region 2 PACE Committee
>>
>> Congress has enacted sweeping patent reform that is adverse to small
>> inventors and entrepreneurs. How will this affect you? Let=92s explore
>> what the future holds with our panel of experts. Lunch and networking
>> reception are included. Student members may bring a guest at no
>> additional cost. Door prizes! Additional details at the link below.
>>
>> When: Saturday, November 5 10am-2pm
>>
>> Where: Loyola University Graduate Centers Room 260
>> 8890 McGaw Road Columbia, MD 21045 USA
>>
>> Cost: $10 IEEE members (advance), $20 general
>>
>> Web Page:www.ieee-consultants.org
>>
>> Registration:http://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/meeting_view/list_meeting/87=
>71
>>
>> Panelists: Dr. Lee Hollaar, Dr. Amelia Morani
>>
>> We are still looking for a panelist who is a consultant able to speak
>> regarding the impact of this new law. =A0Anyone available in the area?
>

Eric Jacobsen
Anchor Hill Communications
www.anchorhill.com

Article: 153052
Subject: Re: Patent Reform Town Hall Meeting (Balt/Washington Area IEEE
From: rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 23 Nov 2011 15:09:13 -0800 (PST)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Nov 23, 12:27=A0pm, eric.jacob...@ieee.org (Eric Jacobsen) wrote:
> Rick and all,
>
> Ran across this the other day and thought it might be useful. =A0 I
> haven't had a chance to go through much of the material (because
> there's a lot!), but it looks to be along the same lines as what you
> had pulled together.
>
> Presentation materials are available in the links as well.
>
> http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/seminars/AIA-seminar/default.asp
>
> On Sat, 5 Nov 2011 16:46:03 -0700 (PDT), rickman <gnu...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> >You guys missed a really great discussion today. =A0We had to expert
> >presenters and two representatives from the Patent Office. =A0They
> >discussed a lot of issues that have been raised here. =A0I only wish I
> >had taken better notes. =A0I did get the chance to speak directly with
> >Dr Lee Hollaar who spoke of several ways to deep six a patent. =A0One is
> >to file (free) with the patent office a notice of a publication which
> >would represent prior art. =A0This is attached at an application or even
> >a granted patent. =A0If the patent holder tries to enforce the patent by
> >filing suit in court the lawyer would be guilty of filing not in good
> >faith or some such legal term and would be in deep sneakers with the
> >court. =A0There were other things that can be done and they don't
> >require you to be a lawyer or use one.
>
> >I was very impressed with the knowledge of the presenters as well as
> >the USPTO representatives. =A0Probably the most useful thing that was
> >said was that there are many views of the new law but it is the law.
> >Those who are most aware of it and use it are the ones who will most
> >profit. =A0Getting an attitude about it accomplishes nothing.
>
> >BTW, many of the provisions don't take effect for over a year. =A0So it
> >is just like an election, file early and file often!
>
> >Rick
>
> >On Oct 24, 3:59=3DA0pm, rickman <gnu...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> Co-sponsored by
> >> IEEE NCA Consultants Network,
> >> Baltimore Consultants Network,
> >> Society on Social Implications of Technology,
> >> Baltimore and NoVA/Wash. Computer Society,
> >> and Region 2 PACE Committee
>
> >> Congress has enacted sweeping patent reform that is adverse to small
> >> inventors and entrepreneurs. How will this affect you? Let=3D92s explo=
re
> >> what the future holds with our panel of experts. Lunch and networking
> >> reception are included. Student members may bring a guest at no
> >> additional cost. Door prizes! Additional details at the link below.
>
> >> When: Saturday, November 5 10am-2pm
>
> >> Where: Loyola University Graduate Centers Room 260
> >> 8890 McGaw Road Columbia, MD 21045 USA
>
> >> Cost: $10 IEEE members (advance), $20 general
>
> >> Web Page:www.ieee-consultants.org
>
> >> Registration:http://meetings.vtools.ieee.org/meeting_view/list_meeting=
/87=3D
> >71
>
> >> Panelists: Dr. Lee Hollaar, Dr. Amelia Morani
>
> >> We are still looking for a panelist who is a consultant able to speak
> >> regarding the impact of this new law. =3DA0Anyone available in the are=
a?
>
> Eric Jacobsen
> Anchor Hill Communicationswww.anchorhill.com

Thanks Eric,

This was in our area, but I wasn't able to attend myself.  I did hear
it was a good presentation.

Rick

Article: 153053
Subject: Xilinx chipscope via Virtualbox
From: Michael Laajanen <michael_laajanen@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 10:02:17 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hi,

Has anyone managed to get a Mac running XP in a Virtualbox connect to 
Xilinx Platform cable USB?

/michael

Article: 153054
Subject: Re: Xilinx chipscope via Virtualbox
From: Bart Fox <bartfox@gmx.net>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 11:16:45 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Am 24.11.11 10:02, schrieb Michael Laajanen:
> Has anyone managed to get a Mac running XP in a Virtualbox connect to
> Xilinx Platform cable USB?

Yes. Check this site:

http://peeters-noppe.net/alcaic/2009/09/virtualbox-and-the-xilinx-usb-platform-cable/

Bart

Article: 153055
Subject: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: Tim <tim@bugblatbugblat.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 11:33:33 +0000
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched via www.findchips.com.

Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C  -  $29897.06
High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E  -  $67150.00

Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production" 
chip in the history of the galaxy?

Of course, it's probably pretty cheap in terms of transistors per 
dollar. Heroic engineering, but I'm glad I am not a stockholder.


Article: 153056
Subject: Re: Patent Reform Town Hall Meeting (Balt/Washington Area IEEE Consultants
From: Noob <root@127.0.0.1>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 13:30:08 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
glen herrmannsfeldt wrote:

> This reminds me of something I was interested in some time ago, 
> though never got into researching it more.  That is, the ability
> to search encrypted text.  If one could have a file if encrypted, 
> but not published, text, and the appropriate search algorithm, one
> could determine, for example, the possible existence of prior art
> without being able to actually read it.  One might be able to find
> that some unpublished provisional contained wording that might
> cause it to be prior art.

Your description reminds me of Zero-knowledge proofs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-knowledge_proof

Article: 153057
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 05:35:37 -0800 (PST)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Nov 24, 6:33=A0am, Tim <t...@bugblatbugblat.com> wrote:
> These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched viawww.findchips.com.
>
> Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C =A0- =A0$29897.06
> High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E =A0- =A0$67150.00
>
> Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production"
> chip in the history of the galaxy?
>
> Of course, it's probably pretty cheap in terms of transistors per
> dollar. Heroic engineering, but I'm glad I am not a stockholder.

I guess they are only getting one good chip per wafer... after you add
in the cost of development the chips are a little on the expensive
side.

I worked for a test equipment maker once and they were using the
largest chip Xilinx made at that time which was a bargain at $1000.
But then the box it went in sold for $150,000 so the chip cost was
lost in the noise.  I think they only expected to sell ten or so which
means they barely covered their development costs.  The funny thing
was they were only using 10% of the chip, the rest was for "future
expansion".  That's how little they cared about the cost.

Rick

Article: 153058
Subject: Re: Production Programming of Flash for FPGAs and MCUs
From: <news@rblack01.plus.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 14:27:30 -0000
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
In article <90ab17f7-1ece-4eb7-b511-bea1a5c38610@
4g2000yqu.googlegroups.com>, gnuarm@gmail.com says...
> Someone on Linkedin asked about a stand alone device for programming
> the flash for FPGAs in the field or in a production environment.
> There doesn't seem to be anything currently available like this.
> Looking at the big three manufacturers I see at least two formats for
> the files that might be used.  Xilinx and Lattice use SVF with Xilins
> offering support for a compressed version called... XSVF of course.
> Altera uses JAM.  JAM seems to be a JEDEC standard while SVF appears
> to be a defacto industry standard developed by a company.
> 
> I'm curious why two standards came about.  Was there a problem with
> using the version the company developed?  I'm assuming the industry
> version came first and the JEDEC version came later.  Or is that
> wrong?  It won't be too much trouble to support both, but I don't get
> why both standards exist.
> 
> How do you program production devices?  I know in large facilities
> they pay big bucks for JTAG hardware and software that will work
> across the spectrum including test and diagnosis.  I'm thinking there
> is a market for a more limited device that is just used to program the
> non-volatile memory in embedded systems in an efficient manner for
> production and field upgrades.  Any thoughts?
> 
> Rick
> 

I asked the same question on here, a few years ago, and most of the 
answers that came back were along the lines of "why would you want to do 
that?".  As you say, there doesn't seem to be any stand-alone device 
available.
As our product is based on an embedded PC with a parallel port, we built 
a copy of the Altera ByteBlaster on our last board (basically a 74HC244 
and a few other parts), and used the reference code from Altera to do 
the programming.
Others have mentioned using a bootloader in the FPGA code, and using 
this to do the re-programming.  I'm wary of doing this as there is no 
way AFAIK to separate the bootloader functionality from the rest of the 
code in the EEPROM bitstream and only erase / re-program the sectors 
needed, so if there is a power failure in the middle of the update the 
user has a bricked machine.
We are currently moving to a platform which has no parallel port and 
trying to get the Altera JTAG JAM player working, using a PIC18F4550 
(which was on the board anyway and has a few spare pins) as a bit-banged 
controller, with the JAM file downloaded from the PC via UART.  I'll let 
you know if we ever get it working...

In summary, if you want a standalone JTAG Flash programmer,  you'll 
probably have to make your own.  We may end up doing this ourselves, but 
it's not a high-priority project at the moment.

Article: 153059
Subject: Re: Xilinx chipscope via Virtualbox
From: Michael Laajanen <michael_laajanen@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 15:34:18 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hi,
Bart Fox skrev 2011-11-24 11:16:
> Am 24.11.11 10:02, schrieb Michael Laajanen:
>> Has anyone managed to get a Mac running XP in a Virtualbox connect to
>> Xilinx Platform cable USB?
>
> Yes. Check this site:
>
> http://peeters-noppe.net/alcaic/2009/09/virtualbox-and-the-xilinx-usb-platform-cable/
>
>
> Bart
Thanks, I will try that out.

I would be great to have the lab env(chipscope) as a preinstall 
Virtialbox image instance from Xilinx and Altera also!

Then it would be very convinient to setup in labs and so especially if 
you are moving around!.

/michael




Article: 153060
Subject: Re: Production Programming of Flash for FPGAs and MCUs
From: rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 08:51:43 -0800 (PST)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Nov 24, 9:27=A0am, <n...@rblack01.plus.com> wrote:
> In article <90ab17f7-1ece-4eb7-b511-bea1a5c38610@
> 4g2000yqu.googlegroups.com>, gnu...@gmail.com says...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Someone on Linkedin asked about a stand alone device for programming
> > the flash for FPGAs in the field or in a production environment.
> > There doesn't seem to be anything currently available like this.
> > Looking at the big three manufacturers I see at least two formats for
> > the files that might be used. =A0Xilinx and Lattice use SVF with Xilins
> > offering support for a compressed version called... XSVF of course.
> > Altera uses JAM. =A0JAM seems to be a JEDEC standard while SVF appears
> > to be a defacto industry standard developed by a company.
>
> > I'm curious why two standards came about. =A0Was there a problem with
> > using the version the company developed? =A0I'm assuming the industry
> > version came first and the JEDEC version came later. =A0Or is that
> > wrong? =A0It won't be too much trouble to support both, but I don't get
> > why both standards exist.
>
> > How do you program production devices? =A0I know in large facilities
> > they pay big bucks for JTAG hardware and software that will work
> > across the spectrum including test and diagnosis. =A0I'm thinking there
> > is a market for a more limited device that is just used to program the
> > non-volatile memory in embedded systems in an efficient manner for
> > production and field upgrades. =A0Any thoughts?
>
> > Rick
>
> I asked the same question on here, a few years ago, and most of the
> answers that came back were along the lines of "why would you want to do
> that?". =A0As you say, there doesn't seem to be any stand-alone device
> available.
> As our product is based on an embedded PC with a parallel port, we built
> a copy of the Altera ByteBlaster on our last board (basically a 74HC244
> and a few other parts), and used the reference code from Altera to do
> the programming.
> Others have mentioned using a bootloader in the FPGA code, and using
> this to do the re-programming. =A0I'm wary of doing this as there is no
> way AFAIK to separate the bootloader functionality from the rest of the
> code in the EEPROM bitstream and only erase / re-program the sectors
> needed, so if there is a power failure in the middle of the update the
> user has a bricked machine.
> We are currently moving to a platform which has no parallel port and
> trying to get the Altera JTAG JAM player working, using a PIC18F4550
> (which was on the board anyway and has a few spare pins) as a bit-banged
> controller, with the JAM file downloaded from the PC via UART. =A0I'll le=
t
> you know if we ever get it working...
>
> In summary, if you want a standalone JTAG Flash programmer, =A0you'll
> probably have to make your own. =A0We may end up doing this ourselves, bu=
t
> it's not a high-priority project at the moment.

That is what I am thinking of, but for boards that don't have an
embedded micro.  Often the embedded micro is embedded into the FPGA
rather than being a chip on the board.

I was surprised to find that there are at least two main lines of
standards for this.  But they seem to be very similar, just more code
to debug is all.  Then they both have ASCII text versions as well as
compressed binary versions.  I haven't found a draft copy of the JAM
spec.  I could work from the code and reverse engineer that, but I'd
prefer to have a peek at the spec.  I guess I'll have to shell out the
$100.

Rick

Article: 153061
Subject: Re: Production Programming of Flash for FPGAs and MCUs
From: rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 08:53:29 -0800 (PST)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Nov 18, 9:10=A0pm, "AMD...@gmail.com" <amd...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> IEEE 1532 is something that is a bit newer, I believe both xilinx and
> altera
> support it, not sure 'bout the others.http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/1532=
/

I took a look at this link and it requires a password even though it
is for a draft copy of the spec.  Any idea where to get the user id
and password?

Rick

Article: 153062
Subject: Re: Production Programming of Flash for FPGAs and MCUs
From: nico@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel)
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 20:30:48 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
<news@rblack01.plus.com> wrote:

>In article <90ab17f7-1ece-4eb7-b511-bea1a5c38610@
>4g2000yqu.googlegroups.com>, gnuarm@gmail.com says...
>> Someone on Linkedin asked about a stand alone device for programming
>> the flash for FPGAs in the field or in a production environment.
>> There doesn't seem to be anything currently available like this.
>> Looking at the big three manufacturers I see at least two formats for
>> the files that might be used.  Xilinx and Lattice use SVF with Xilins
>> offering support for a compressed version called... XSVF of course.
>> Altera uses JAM.  JAM seems to be a JEDEC standard while SVF appears
>> to be a defacto industry standard developed by a company.

>code in the EEPROM bitstream and only erase / re-program the sectors 
>needed, so if there is a power failure in the middle of the update the 
>user has a bricked machine.
>We are currently moving to a platform which has no parallel port and 
>trying to get the Altera JTAG JAM player working, using a PIC18F4550 
>(which was on the board anyway and has a few spare pins) as a bit-banged 
>controller, with the JAM file downloaded from the PC via UART.  I'll let 
>you know if we ever get it working...
>
>In summary, if you want a standalone JTAG Flash programmer,  you'll 
>probably have to make your own.  We may end up doing this ourselves, but 
>it's not a high-priority project at the moment.

OpenOCD is a good start when it comes to Jtag. However I strongly
prefer using an SPI solution instead of jtag. I avoid jtag like the
plague.

-- 
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
--------------------------------------------------------------

Article: 153063
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 19:00:33 -0600
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Tim wrote:

> These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched via www.findchips.com.
> 
> Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C  -  $29897.06
> High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E  -  $67150.00
> 
> Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production"
> chip in the history of the galaxy?
Who can afford these things?  The NSA?  How many of these are
they going to sell a year, a dozen?

Jon

Article: 153064
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: hal-usenet@ip-64-139-1-69.sjc.megapath.net (Hal Murray)
Date: Thu, 24 Nov 2011 20:42:16 -0600
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
In article <5ec4deda-3211-41b1-99be-da1abf87b0c1@4g2000yqu.googlegroups.com>,
 rickman <gnuarm@gmail.com> writes:

>I worked for a test equipment maker once and they were using the
>largest chip Xilinx made at that time which was a bargain at $1000.
>But then the box it went in sold for $150,000 so the chip cost was
>lost in the noise.  I think they only expected to sell ten or so which
>means they barely covered their development costs.  The funny thing
>was they were only using 10% of the chip, the rest was for "future
>expansion".  That's how little they cared about the cost.

That sounds like a good project for a MBA type case study.

I could easily believe that $10K is cheap insurance.  How much would
it cost to figure out what size chip to use?  Don't forget lost opportunity
cost as well as the more obvious costs.  Do you want your best guys
spending time on figuring out what size chip to use or getting the project
ready to ship?

-- 
These are my opinions, not necessarily my employer's.  I hate spam.


Article: 153065
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: "Morten Leikvoll" <mleikvol@yahoo.nospam>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 08:57:31 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
"Tim" <tim@bugblatbugblat.com> wrote in message 
news:iYpzq.83081$WC5.57219@newsfe09.ams2...
> These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched via www.findchips.com.
>
> Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C  -  $29897.06
> High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E  -  $67150.00
>
> Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production" 
> chip in the history of the galaxy?
>
> Of course, it's probably pretty cheap in terms of transistors per dollar. 
> Heroic engineering, but I'm glad I am not a stockholder.

The prices there are probably worthless. Make a serious approach to a Xilinx 
distributor, and you will get a completely different price. Still expensive, 
but a lot lower.
That happens with both Altera and Xilinx, as they have full control of 
customers and prices. Each customer gets its own price, based on forecast, 
risk and a few other parameters.



Article: 153066
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: "Morten Leikvoll" <mleikvol@yahoo.nospam>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 08:58:35 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
"Morten Leikvoll" <mleikvol@yahoo.nospam> wrote in message 
news:T--dnVYCpt7211LTnZ2dnUVZ8lCdnZ2d@lyse.net...
> "Tim" <tim@bugblatbugblat.com> wrote in message 
> news:iYpzq.83081$WC5.57219@newsfe09.ams2...
>> These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched via www.findchips.com.
>>
>> Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C  -  $29897.06
>> High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E  -  $67150.00
>>
>> Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production" 
>> chip in the history of the galaxy?
>>
>> Of course, it's probably pretty cheap in terms of transistors per dollar. 
>> Heroic engineering, but I'm glad I am not a stockholder.
>
> The prices there are probably worthless. Make a serious approach to a 
> Xilinx distributor, and you will get a completely different price. Still 
> expensive, but a lot lower.
> That happens with both Altera and Xilinx, as they have full control of 
> customers and prices. Each customer gets its own price, based on forecast, 
> risk and a few other parameters.

And I should add, the next chips will progably be even cheaper. It is normal 
to give a step price model to customers.



Article: 153067
Subject: Re: Patent Reform Town Hall Meeting (Balt/Washington Area IEEE
From: Rob Gaddi <rgaddi@technologyhighland.invalid>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 19:05:24 +0000 (UTC)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 13:30:08 +0100, Noob wrote:

> glen herrmannsfeldt wrote:
> 
>> This reminds me of something I was interested in some time ago, though
>> never got into researching it more.  That is, the ability to search
>> encrypted text.  If one could have a file if encrypted, but not
>> published, text, and the appropriate search algorithm, one could
>> determine, for example, the possible existence of prior art without
>> being able to actually read it.  One might be able to find that some
>> unpublished provisional contained wording that might cause it to be
>> prior art.
> 
> Your description reminds me of Zero-knowledge proofs.
> 
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-knowledge_proof

Until I followed that link, I thought that response was a lot more 
insulting than it turned out to be.

-- 
Rob Gaddi, Highland Technology -- www.highlandtechnology.com
Email address domain is currently out of order.  See above to fix.

Article: 153068
Subject: Re: Patent Reform Town Hall Meeting (Balt/Washington Area IEEE Consultants
From: Niklas Holsti <niklas.holsti@tidorum.invalid>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 21:06:16 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On 11-11-07 22:08 , glen herrmannsfeldt wrote:

> This reminds me of something I was interested in some time ago,
> though never got into researching it more.  That is, the ability
> to search encrypted text.  If one could have a file if encrypted,
> but not published, text, and the appropriate search algorithm, one
> could determine, for example, the possible existance of prior art
> without being able to actually read it.  One might be able to find
> that some unpublished provisional contained wording that might
> cause it to be prior art.
>
> I believe that there are other uses for such ability, and some
> might even be patentable.

Google for "computing on encrypted data". This is an active research area.


-- 
Niklas Holsti
Tidorum Ltd
niklas holsti tidorum fi
       .      @       .

Article: 153069
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: Bob Perlman <cambriandesign@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 12:10:50 -0800 (PST)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Nov 24, 3:33=A0am, Tim <t...@bugblatbugblat.com> wrote:
> These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched viawww.findchips.com.
>
> Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C =A0- =A0$29897.06
> High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E =A0- =A0$67150.00
>
> Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production"
> chip in the history of the galaxy?
>
> Of course, it's probably pretty cheap in terms of transistors per
> dollar. Heroic engineering, but I'm glad I am not a stockholder.

This is why I always buy FPGAs in the jumbo economy pack.

Bob Perlman
Cambrian Design Works

Article: 153070
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com>
Date: 25 Nov 2011 20:28:09 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 11:33:33 +0000, Tim wrote:

> These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched via www.findchips.com.
> 
> Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C  -  $29897.06 High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E
>  -  $67150.00
> 
> Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production"
> chip in the history of the galaxy?
> 
> Of course, it's probably pretty cheap in terms of transistors per
> dollar. Heroic engineering, but I'm glad I am not a stockholder.

That's a pretty good price for parts that are made out of pure 
unobtainium. 

Article: 153071
Subject: Re: Patent Reform Town Hall Meeting (Balt/Washington Area IEEE Consultants Network)
From: eric.jacobsen@ieee.org (Eric Jacobsen)
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 20:28:26 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On Fri, 25 Nov 2011 19:05:24 +0000 (UTC), Rob Gaddi
<rgaddi@technologyhighland.invalid> wrote:

>On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 13:30:08 +0100, Noob wrote:
>
>> glen herrmannsfeldt wrote:
>> 
>>> This reminds me of something I was interested in some time ago, though
>>> never got into researching it more.  That is, the ability to search
>>> encrypted text.  If one could have a file if encrypted, but not
>>> published, text, and the appropriate search algorithm, one could
>>> determine, for example, the possible existence of prior art without
>>> being able to actually read it.  One might be able to find that some
>>> unpublished provisional contained wording that might cause it to be
>>> prior art.
>> 
>> Your description reminds me of Zero-knowledge proofs.
>> 
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-knowledge_proof
>
>Until I followed that link, I thought that response was a lot more 
>insulting than it turned out to be.
>
>-- 
>Rob Gaddi, Highland Technology -- www.highlandtechnology.com
>Email address domain is currently out of order.  See above to fix.

Yeah, that's pretty cool.   I didn't know there was a name for it or
even any sort of formalization.   Sweet.


Eric Jacobsen
Anchor Hill Communications
www.anchorhill.com

Article: 153072
Subject: Re: XC7V2000T, the perfect Thanksgiving gift
From: nico@puntnl.niks (Nico Coesel)
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 21:08:29 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Jon Elson <elson@pico-systems.com> wrote:

>Tim wrote:
>
>> These prices come up on Avnet Express. I searched via www.findchips.com.
>> 
>> Low end: XC7V2000T-1FH1761C  -  $29897.06
>> High end: XC7V2000T-G2FLG1925E  -  $67150.00
>> 
>> Does that make the the XC7V2000 the most expensive "standard production"
>> chip in the history of the galaxy?
>Who can afford these things?  The NSA?

The same people that spend that kind of money on a scope or logic
analyzer. I guess these devices are very handy for prototyping ASICs.

The most expensive Virtex I ever worked with was $1000. At that time
my employer let us re-design the product using a couple of Spartan 2
devices.

-- 
Failure does not prove something is impossible, failure simply
indicates you are not using the right tools...
nico@nctdevpuntnl (punt=.)
--------------------------------------------------------------

Article: 153073
Subject: Re: Patent Reform Town Hall Meeting (Balt/Washington Area IEEE Consultants Network)
From: glen herrmannsfeldt <gah@ugcs.caltech.edu>
Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2011 22:26:54 +0000 (UTC)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
In comp.arch.fpga Rob Gaddi <rgaddi@technologyhighland.invalid> wrote:
> On Thu, 24 Nov 2011 13:30:08 +0100, Noob wrote:

(snip) 
>>> That is, the ability to search encrypted text.  
>>> If one could have a file of encrypted, but not
>>> published, text, and the appropriate search algorithm, 
>>> one could determine, for example, the possible existence 
>>> of prior art without being able to actually read it.  
(snip)
 
>> Your description reminds me of Zero-knowledge proofs.
 
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-knowledge_proof

Yes, I believe that they are related.  

> Until I followed that link, I thought that response was a 
> lot more insulting than it turned out to be.

I wondered about that just a little, but was pretty sure that
it was real.  

-- glen

Article: 153074
Subject: Compatible Xilinx USB Cables: worth to bother?
From: Giuseppe Marullo <giuseppe.marullonospam@iname.com>
Date: Sun, 27 Nov 2011 19:04:08 +0100
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hi,
I see on Ebay cheap USB Cables(40-60USD) that claims to be compatible 
with the Xilinx ones. I don't understand wich one, if any, they emulate 
(DLC9G).

Do they work? Are they supported on latest webise under Win7 64bit? Wich 
cable they are compatible with?

TIA,

Giuseppe Marullo

PS: Two examples:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Xilinx-Platform-Cable-USB-CPLD-FPGA-USB-download-cable-/270627772572?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f02ac189c
and

PPS: Someone could please explain the 7 vs 6 pins thing?



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