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Messages from 95350

Article: 95350
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@earthlink.net>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 20:39:09 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Spehro Pefhany wrote:
> 
> There are devices that have a camera mounted vertically with a monitor
> overtop, used for people who have poor vision, but they cost several
> thousands of dollars (small market) if you can't get a subsidy on
> them. I wonder if you could do the same thing with a decent camera and
> an inexpensive monitor. It's got to be better to just move the book
> around under the camera than waiting while the scanner whines and
> grinds its way through each frame.


   The ironic part is that I used to service those vision enhancement
systems back in the '80s, and about 10 years ago I let someone talk me
into selling him my last "C" mount close-up lens.  I have a pile of used
monochrome NTSC video cameras and monitors, both B&W and Color, but I
have not been able to locate a good lens that I can afford.  The only
Veterans I know that got any help from the VA with the vision
enhancement systems all had macular degeneration and the VA sent someone
to pick the equipment up whenever one of them died.  I had a link to a
small CCD close-up camera that you could slide across a page and plug
into the video input of a color monitor, or a TV with video input, but
the link no longer works.  It was $200 to $250, US.  I saw the same
camera being sold a t a flea market, but they wanted $800 for it, and
didn't want to well it without the "Matching" $500 color monitor.  $1300
for maybe $350 worth of electronics.  All they did was sick a couple
cheesy labels over the OEM labels and mark it up almost a grand.  Sam's
Club even had the camera available, but it didn't turn up with their
sorry storefront search engine.


> There are also dedicated reading machines such as the Xerox "Reading
> Edge" which will read books aloud with fair success (you have to get
> used to the text-to-speech 'accent' they have).
> 
> Best regards,
> Spehro Pefhany


-- 
Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
prove it.
Member of DAV #85.

Michael A. Terrell
Central Florida

Article: 95351
Subject: Re: Starting with LVDS
From: "John Adair" <removethisthenleavejea@replacewithcompanyname.co.uk>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 20:56:08 -0000
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Not entirely clear to me that he is looking at the DAC output from those 
words. Didn't even say that the oscilloscpe was actually connected never 
mind what to.

Frank give us all a bit more info. We might be assuming something or nothing 
correctly. The old swing on the tree graphic is coming to mind.

John Adair
Enterpoint Ltd. - We're at DATE2006. Come and say hello.
http://www.enterpoint.co.uk


"Antti Lukats" <antti@openchip.org> wrote in message 
news:dr0p4c$bs9$1@online.de...
> Hi John,
>
> he is looking at DAC output not at LVDS signals. he said assume the wires 
> __and__ DAC are working properly, so hes oscilloscope is on the output of 
> an LVDS DAC
>
> Antti
>
> "John Adair" <removethisthenleavejea@replacewithcompanyname.co.uk> schrieb 
> im Newsbeitrag news:dr0oor$gck$1@newsg2.svr.pol.co.uk...
>> Frank
>>
>> Remember to check the scale on your oscilloscpe. The LVDS signal is very 
>> small and easy to miss if setup for something like TTL levels. I've done 
>> that before myself. If you are using Xilinx you can check if LVDS is 
>> implemented from the pin file I think or do it my favorite way in by 
>> looking at the design in FPGA editor.
>>
>> John Adair
>> Enterpoint Ltd. - Home of Broaddown2. The Ultimate Spartan3 Development 
>> Board.
>> http://www.enterpoint.co.uk
>>
>> "Frank Schreiber" <frankschr@googlemail.com> wrote in message 
>> news:dr0fec$kvu$1@anderson.hrz.tu-chemnitz.de...
>>> Dear all
>>> I'm starting with LVDS.
>>> My task is sending 8-bits signal to LVDS Transmitter port on my board.
>>> I declared a 8 bits vector, assigned pins, and changed values in 8-bits
>>> signal, but nothing happended in my oscilloscope. Assume that pins-out 
>>> are
>>> right assigned, all wires and DAC are working perfectly.
>>> Can anyone advise me, how to make it works.
>>> Many thanks
>>> Frank
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
> 



Article: 95352
Subject: Re: Xilinx padding LC numbers, how do you feel about it?
From: not@home.com (Tim)
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:08:27 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Guess I'm not the only one but I keep an excel file updated with all the key
xilinx and altera parts that I'll likely use. 2 spreadsheet columns, 1 for
fabric columns, 1 for fabric rows, excel calculates the product as well as
subtracting the fabric cells taken up by PPC, etc, etc. I also add columns for
number of multipliers, IOB delays, etc, etc, (again!). When I occasionally get a
crack at a new project start, sort by the key architectural features, and end up
with a shortlist of parts, usually narrowed down to 1 from A and 1 from X (I'm
convinced they do it deliberately!).

You soon learn to ignore the marketing BS...

On 19 Jan 2006 12:35:11 -0800, "rickman" <spamgoeshere4@yahoo.com> wrote:

>As we have all known for some time, Xilinx has had a habit of padding
>the logic cell counts in their data sheets to account for
>"effectiveness".  This factor is 1.125 or 9 LCs per CLB in the newest
>parts.  I still find this very odd, but mainly annoying because when I
>want the true LC count, I have to calculate it myself.
>
>Anyone else find this to be a bit rediculous?
>


Article: 95353
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: Pooh Bear <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:24:55 +0000
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>


Ian wrote:

> "Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:43D2BE7D.7E0920D4@hotmail.com...
> >
> >
> > Lanarcam wrote:
> >
> >> Pooh Bear wrote:
> >> > Richard Henry wrote:
> >> >
> <snip>> > >
> >> > > It is believed that a version of bird flu was the virus that infected
> >> > > the
> >> > > world in 1918.
> >> >
> >> > I know that.
> >> >
> >> > So why's is it a special problem in 2006 ? And not in the intervening
> >> > years ?
> >> >
> >> > My point is that we should have been equally worried all that time but
> >> > it
> >> > wasn't a lead news story for nearly a century.
> >>
> >> "The current outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza
> >> are the largest and most severe on records. Never before
> >> in the history of this disease have so many countries been
> >> simultaneously infected"
> >> http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/avian_faqs/en/index.html#howdo
> >
> > At last ! Some light on the subject.
> >
> > Thanks,        Graham
>
> Stats I've seen (sorry, no citation) gave the mortality rate for the 1918
> flu outbreak as 10%
> of infections, for the current strain 50%+.
>
> Regards
>     Ian

Yup. The H5N1 has indeed to date resulted in ~ 50% human mortality. That virus
however doesn't transmit readily to humans. The problem will come whenever this
virus develops the ability to infect humans by classic means not involving close
proximity to birds.

Graham



Article: 95354
Subject: Re: Raggedstone specifications ...
From: "John Adair" <removethisthenleavejea@replacewithcompanyname.co.uk>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:35:32 -0000
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Xavier

There are two XCF04 sites. They are mainly just for FPGA programming. The 
second site is generally only usable if you are using a bigger FPGA unless 
you use the mechanism described in XAPP684. There are some words on our FAQ 
page http://www.enterpoint.co.uk/moelbryn/raggedstone1_faq.html about this. 
As yet we have not tested the bigger FPGA in-site or the XAPP684 
functionality. In theory Raggedstone1 can be fitted with as big a part as a 
XC3S2000 but if we do that it will be most likely be a special to celebrate 
something or dare I say it someone offers us enough money or reason to do 
it. The special might be the 10000th ship of Raggedstone1 but I'm only 
teasing at the moment. I think we are going to giving away some RS1-1500 
shortly with our free seminar series  not that we don't do that at RS1-400's 
normal selling price. If  we do that we should at least get some testing 
done with a bigger chip fitted on Raggedstone1.

Back to the serious. There is a bypass resistor on the second flash which is 
removed for series use. Datasheet of Platform Flash should show the 
arrangement. Changing the FPGA isn't recommended unless you have a full BGA 
rework capability and even then you will invalidate warranty. If you want 
greater capability then I would recommend either of our 2 other Spartan-3 
boards currently available - MINI-CAN or Broaddown2. Broaddown3 isn't far 
off either for those that want a very large Spartan-3. They are dearer but 
particularly the Broaddown2 can do so much more. There are some user 
features of Broaddown2 that we have not as yet tested or even mentioned in 
the manual such is the depth of things it can do. Anyway we took the best of 
Broaddown2 made it a 4 layer pcb that still got most of the XC3S400-4FG456C 
pinout used and got the 50 Raggedstone1. It's a very good board for the 
money and we're proud to have it as a product.

As with anything we do it is always worth knowing that we do custom 
specials. It does cost NRE and/or extra manufacture cost depending on the 
difference to the norm. Just depends what you want and when.

John Adair
Enterpoint Ltd. - Home of Broaddown4. The Ultimate Virtex-4 Development 
Board.
http://www.enterpoint.co.uk


"Xavier T" <xavier.tastet@gmail.com> wrote in message 
news:1137941409.126836.310770@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> John,
> I have some questions :
> In the user manual it's stated that there is two sites for platform
> flash.
> If we solder the second flash, is it usable ? how we can select between
> the first and the second ?
> Can we fit two xcf04 and a bigger fpga ?
> X.
> 



Article: 95355
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: kensmith@green.rahul.net (Ken Smith)
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:41:43 +0000 (UTC)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
In article <43D2D1C8.347A3224@hotmail.com>,
Pooh Bear  <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote:
>I was under the impression that H5N1 had been around for quite some time.

Logically: The virus killing so many birds in the far east can't be all
that old.  If it had been around for a very long time, it would have
selected the birds for being resistant to it.

A google search found this:

http://newsfromrussia.com/science/2005/05/20/59871.html
*** begin quote ***

According to the Food Consumer, ever since 2003, over 90 people in 
southern Asia have suffered from the bird flu caused by a virus known as 
influenza A/H5N1. The WHO believes that the original bird virus could have 
mutated over the years, and now a new variant might be spreading from 
person to person and it could potentially infect millions of people 
leading to hundreds of thousands of deaths.

******** end 

It seems like the makers of virus DNA don't use a good CVS system and end 
up with several versions with the same version number.  H5N1 seems to 
describe a whole class of flu virus.



-- 
--
kensmith@rahul.net   forging knowledge


Article: 95356
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: kensmith@green.rahul.net (Ken Smith)
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 21:44:51 +0000 (UTC)
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
In article <dr0fdp$ji1$1@nwrdmz02.dmz.ncs.ea.ibs-infra.bt.com>,
Ian <i.buckner_NOT_@btinternet.com> wrote:
[...]
>Stats I've seen (sorry, no citation) gave the mortality rate for the 1918 
>flu outbreak as 10%
>of infections, for the current strain 50%+.

There may be a problem with stats.  Of those who died of the new flu 100% 
died from it.  Of those who caught it but didn't die, less than 100% got 
reported.  This could bias the numbers towards a higher kill rate than is 
really the case.

This new flu could already be more wide spread than we think if it is also 
less dangerous than we think.


-- 
--
kensmith@rahul.net   forging knowledge


Article: 95357
Subject: Re: The attributes specified to DCM instance doesnot get written to the .vm file
From: mk <kal*@dspia.*comdelete>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 22:19:31 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
On 22 Jan 2006 08:03:53 -0800, "Sudhir Shetty"
<sudhirshettyk@gmail.com> wrote:

>Hi ,
>I create a instance of DCM as follows :
>
>DCM i_DCM (...
>        ...
>        ...
>        ) /* synthesis xc_props ="DLL_FREQUENCY_MODE =
>LOW,DUTY_CYCLE_CORRECTION = TRUE, <more parameters > */; //note this
>directive is on a single line without line-breaks
>
>
>But I see that in the post-synthesis .vm file there is no defparams
>added for these attributes.

That's normal as there is no tool which would need those parameters at
that point. What's important is whether those parameters get written
to the EDF file which goes into the PAR correctly and whether the
Xilinx toolset uses the properly.

Article: 95358
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: Joerg <notthisjoergsch@removethispacbell.net>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 22:22:26 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hello Michael,

> 
>    Did you ever use those paper "Slide rules" that were made to
> calculate values for tuned circuits, or to design single layer coils?  I
> still have the Electrovoice L/C calaculator, and may have the old Allied
> Electronics Coil calculator.
> 
>  
Yes, I've got one of those. Just have to find it :-) I use the Aristo 
for that stuff as well.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Article: 95359
Subject: Re: Xilinx padding LC numbers, how do you feel about it?
From: "Brian Davis" <brimdavis@aol.com>
Date: 22 Jan 2006 14:27:49 -0800
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Tim wrote:
> Guess I'm not the only one but I keep an excel file updated with all the key
> xilinx and altera parts that I'll likely use.
>
 There's also a handy part comparison generator (Xilinx only),
brought to us by the friendly janitorial staff over at Fliptronics,
that can be found over here:

 http://www.fpga-faq.org/compare/build_form.cgi

Brian


Article: 95360
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: Joerg <notthisjoergsch@removethispacbell.net>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 22:29:11 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hello Chris,


>>But not qualified in my field.
> 
> Yes. EXACTLY Qualified in your field!!!
> 

So who would that be on the California board?


>>What do they know about medical 
>>electronics?
> 
> Virtually everything. The people who asses your application and do the
> interview... (I forgot to mention that apart from the academic
> qualifications, the relevant experience and additional training there is
> also an interview) will be in the same field as yourself. In your case
> medical electronics. 
> 

Sorry, but I seriously doubt that. Medical ultrasound is such a small 
field. If you try to find an analog engineer in that field the number of 
really useful resumes coming back is typically zero. Tried it. People 
who have never designed an ultrasound scanner know next to nothing about 
that technology. It's not taught in enough detail anywhere.


>>Sure, they could test me on how to design bridges and I 
>>would still remember the basics of structural load and stress 
>>calculations. Problem is, I do not design bridges.
> 
> What have bridges got to do with it? Unless you are a Civil Engineer
> applying via the Institute of Civil Engineers.
> 

Just look at the question on those exams.


>>And how would the others get a job? How would you prove experience if 
>>you never worked under, for or next to a licensed engineer because there 
>>were none?
> 
> In the UK there are enough for this to not be too much of a problem.  
> 

Well, not in the US.


> If the licence became a requirement it would improve things. Just like
> it has in all the other professions where it is required. 
> 

I disagree 100%.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Article: 95361
Subject: Re: need for a group FAQ?
From: "Brian Davis" <brimdavis@aol.com>
Date: 22 Jan 2006 14:44:33 -0800
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Symon wrote:
>
> As penance, I'll still get the dessert AND write a little article about it
> for the FAQ. (The fpga-org.com FAQ that is!)
>
  Probably a bit OT for comp.arch.fpga; might I suggest instead the
FAQ at schwarzwaldkirschtortemitschlagsahne.org

Brian


Article: 95362
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: Chris Hills <chris@phaedsys.org>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 23:29:00 +0000
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
In article <XGTAf.21849$PL5.10823@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com>, Joerg
<notthisjoergsch@removethispacbell.net> writes
>Hello Chris,
>
>
>>>But not qualified in my field.
>> 
>> Yes. EXACTLY Qualified in your field!!!
>> 
>
>So who would that be on the California board?

No idea why would I. I was explaining how the UK system works. You apear
to be just splitting hairs for the sake of it.

>
>>>What do they know about medical 
>>>electronics?
>> 
>> Virtually everything. The people who asses your application and do the
>> interview... (I forgot to mention that apart from the academic
>> qualifications, the relevant experience and additional training there is
>> also an interview) will be in the same field as yourself. In your case
>> medical electronics. 
>> 
>
>Sorry, but I seriously doubt that. Medical ultrasound is such a small 
>field. If you try to find an analog engineer in that field the number of 
>really useful resumes coming back is typically zero. Tried it. People 
>who have never designed an ultrasound scanner know next to nothing about 
>that technology. It's not taught in enough detail anywhere.

So you are a genius in your field and no one else can judge you. I bet I
can find a few people who know about that filed though :-)

>>>Sure, they could test me on how to design bridges and I 
>>>would still remember the basics of structural load and stress 
>>>calculations. Problem is, I do not design bridges.
>> 
>> What have bridges got to do with it? Unless you are a Civil Engineer
>> applying via the Institute of Civil Engineers.
>> 
>Just look at the question on those exams.

which exams?
>

>>>And how would the others get a job? How would you prove experience if 
>>>you never worked under, for or next to a licensed engineer because there 
>>>were none?
>> 
>> In the UK there are enough for this to not be too much of a problem.  
>
>Well, not in the US.

No yet anyway but it will happen in the US as there tends to be more
litigation. I have said for years that this will be driven more by the
Insurance companies than the engineers.

>> If the licence became a requirement it would improve things. Just like
>> it has in all the other professions where it is required. 
>> 
>
>I disagree 100%.

That is would work in this industry or that it works well in all the
others. 

It is proven to work in all the other professions so what is your
evidence that it won't work in embedded engineering? 


-- 
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ chris@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/




Article: 95363
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: Joerg <notthisjoergsch@removethispacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 00:43:08 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hello Chris,

>>
>>>>But not qualified in my field.
>>>
>>>Yes. EXACTLY Qualified in your field!!!
>>
>>So who would that be on the California board?
> 
> No idea why would I. I was explaining how the UK system works. You apear
> to be just splitting hairs for the sake of it.
> 

Maybe in the UK but not in the US. This is not about splitting hair. 
It's about the fact that such a regulatory system is wrong. Just my 
humble opinion. I know we may differ in opinion here.

> 
> So you are a genius in your field and no one else can judge you. I bet I
> can find a few people who know about that filed though :-)
> 

I am not a genius. All I said is that there isn't likely anyone on a 
license board that could assess a candidate in my field of work. The 
chance of finding a license holder that could do that instead is pretty 
much zero as well. I would know them because this world is very small. 
Non-licensed peers (which is pretty much all of them in my case) are 
typically not allowed to vouch for an applicant. Maybe that's different 
in the UK, but it is that way here.

> 
>>>>Sure, they could test me on how to design bridges and I 
>>>>would still remember the basics of structural load and stress 
>>>>calculations. Problem is, I do not design bridges.
>>>
>>>What have bridges got to do with it? Unless you are a Civil Engineer
>>>applying via the Institute of Civil Engineers.
>>>
>>Just look at the question on those exams.
> 
> which exams?
> 

The ones that you have to take to obtain a license, of course. If they 
have the inclination to let you sit for the test, that is.

> 
> No yet anyway but it will happen in the US as there tends to be more
> litigation. I have said for years that this will be driven more by the
> Insurance companies than the engineers.
> 

That's another dead end and here is why: When you have a license in the 
US you usually are forced to take out liability insurance. When you work 
in medical you will, in most states, not find a single carrier who will 
underwrite you. Which means you might have just shot yourself out of 
business by getting a license.

> 
>>>If the licence became a requirement it would improve things. Just like
>>>it has in all the other professions where it is required. 
>>>
>>I disagree 100%.
> 
> That is would work in this industry or that it works well in all the
> others. 
> 
> It is proven to work in all the other professions so what is your
> evidence that it won't work in embedded engineering? 
> 
> 
Engineering licensure exists since many decades. There is no proof that 
it has improved public safety or anything else. I had a nwespaper 
article where even a state license board admitted that. And no, I can't 
tell you where it was. I threw it out because it was irrelevant for 
someone working in industry because we are exempt.

We are talking about engineering here, not medical. But even in medical 
there have been lots of cases where incompetence was proven yet these 
guys had a long-standing license to practice. Of course, in nearly all 
the local cases that been reported in our daily paper the license was 
then revoked. But what good does that do the patient who had been harmed 
or died?

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Article: 95364
Subject: Re: Xilinx padding LC numbers, how do you feel about it?
From: Jeff Cunningham <jcc@sover.net>
Date: Sun, 22 Jan 2006 19:56:23 -0500
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
rickman wrote:
> Peter Alfke wrote:
> 
>>Rickman, why do you ask?\

Rickman, thank you for asking. I am in the process of part selection for 
a new project and wasn't aware of that particular scam!

> I asked because I wanted to hear the the opinion of others.  I read a
> recent Spartan 3 data sheet and noticed that there is now a footnote
> explaining they they are padding the number.  I just find this pretty
> absurd.  You compared it to car makers measuring horsepower, but that
> is a measurement that has parameters.  Countings LCs is counting and
> adding a 12.5% fudge factor is marketing, not measurement.

Marketing? Heck I would call it outright fraud. The silliness with gate 
counts is at least somewhat understandable since there is no really 
meaningful conversion. But if a cookie manufacturer sold boxes of 27 
cookies but stamped on the box that there are 30 inside, isn't that 
considered a crime? They can't defend themselves by saying in the small 
print that their cookies are 12% better than the competition, and they 
count as 1.12 each.

-Jeff

Article: 95365
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: Joerg <notthisjoergsch@removethispacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 01:01:44 GMT
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hello Ray,

> 
> A few points here:
> 1) You can obtain a PE license in any state that adheres to the NSPE 
> guidelines without a degree if you have 20 years experience in the 
> field. That invalidates your concern about ABET certification, since 
> most engineering schools in the US have had the certification for the 
> past 20 years.
> 

Which leave out anyone with a degree from a foreign school. 20+ years 
ago government bodies told students it would be good to gain overseas 
experience and even study there. So, what do we tell them now? That they 
shot themselves in the foot and shouldn't have listened?


> 2) Passing the test is only one of the wickets you need to pass through. 
>  At least as important as the test, is your references who ascribe to 
> know your work and attest that it is worthy of a professional.
> 
> 3) Finding the PE references is a little harder as an EE, but is not 
> impossible.  There's a good chance, for example, that a mechanical 
> engineer in your firm has his PE and can truthfully sign off as being 
> familiar with your work. ...


Never met a single one. In 20 years.


>                     ... If you have outside consultants doing work 
> (not contractors, consultants) for your company, one or more of them 
> will likely have a P.E.  As a last resort, there is nothing stopping you 
> from joining the local chapter of NSPE and getting friendly with the 
> members. Many would be very interested in hearing about your work. They 
> really are a likeable lot. :-)
> 

If remembering correctly NSPE requires at least EIT status to join. 
Neither I nor any of my peers have that.


> 4) Most states in the US DO REQUIRE someone on staff with a PE license 
> if you are offering engineering services in any form to the public. If, 
> as you signature suggests, you are a consultant offering design 
> services, you DO NEED to have someone with a PE license on your staff in 
> most of the 50 states. ...


California doesn't if you only provide services to industry. We have an 
industry exemption.

Other states don't, and I sure won't ever live there.


>                    ... Some states prosecute that more aggressively 
> than others.  My state took all of about 6 months to find me after I 
> hung my shingle out. In most cases, the state has the authority to issue 
> a cease and desist order against you if you cannot prove you have a PE 
> on staff.
> 

They can only do that if you have knowingly pretended to be a PE but 
don't have a license. Anything else would get them inundated in litigation.


> 5) Having a PE license doesn't give you carte blanche to go out and do 
> stuff outside of your area of expertise.  In fact, the code of ethics 
> specifically states that you won't sign off on stuff that is not in your 
> area of expertise.
> 
> 6) Some of the medical firms I've dealt with specifically do require a 
> PE on a project involving medical equipment that could potentially 
> endanger a patient.  I'm not sure if it is a regulatory requirement or 
> not, but it was a requirement from somewhere. ...


I have never encountered that. We live by standards such as UL2601, FDA 
regulations and so on.


>                                          ... If you are working for a 
> medical firm, ask around. I'll bet there is a PE involved somewhere in 
> the project.  Every medical project I've been involved with has had a PE 
> directly involved with the project.


None of them I was involved in had one. And I did ask. The only person I 
found in that direction (and that was one lone case in 20 years) had 
passed the FE test a long time ago and was thus an EIT. She never took 
the final test for PE because there really wasn't a need for it.

As I replied to Chris before a PE license can oblige you to mandatory PL 
coverage. Just for the fun go out and try to find an underwriter. I did, 
until I had blisters from dialing. Zilch. Nada.

> 
> 7) PE licensing is intended to protect the public by certifying that you 
> have demonstrated competency as an engineer in your field.  You needn't 
> have the PE to do engineering work, but if the engineering services are 
> offered to the public, someone with a PE has to be accountable for the 
> work.


That's why I do not offer services to the public ;-)

Heck, I have met a whole lot of power engineers working for utilities. 
They certainly provide direct services to the public. None of them was a PE.

Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com

Article: 95366
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: bill.sloman@ieee.org
Date: 22 Jan 2006 18:53:28 -0800
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>

John Larkin wrote:
> On 22 Jan 2006 00:34:14 -0800, bill.sloman@ieee.org wrote:
>
> >
> >The distribution is the big if. Children's weights will obviously not
> >lie on a Gaussian distribution - there will be a lot more very fat
> >children than very skinny children, because gross obesity takes a long
> >time to kill you, while starvation can do for a kid in a few weeks.
>
> Being thin doesn't mean a kid is starving to death. It just means
> they're skinny. Both my wife and I were very skinny as kids; luckily,
> she still is.

The  disitinction between skinny and active - which is fine - and being
skinny to the point of being listless - which is not - is the one you
should be making. Kids who don't get enough food to be able to afford
to run around fall short in their intellectual development. A few years
ago Scientific American published the results of a South American study
comparing the effects of various sorts of food supplements
(protein-enriched did better).

> >As John Larkin has point out, most of the variability in the U.S.
> >population is going to be concentrated in the fat kids.
> >
>
> The US has an ethnic mix very different from Europe's. Native
> Americans and Pacific islanders tend to get fat on Western diets.
> Southeast asians and filipinos tend to be small and thin. The
> distribution will still be close to normal (you can't avoid the
> central limit theorem) but will be wider than in an ethnically uniform
> population.

Evidence? Caucasians can be fat as kids - as I was, and my brothers and
couple of my cousins (not obese, just well-coverd). Japanese kids
tended to be skinny because they used to be starved - the current
generation is is pretty much up to Western height, which deals with the
hereditary component there ...

My betting is that your weight distribution will have a long tail on
the fat/obese side, and a shorp cut-off around skinny - very
non-Gaussian.

> But if the below-2-sigma part of a population is defined as
> malnourished, then all populations have equal proportion of
> malnourished.
>
> >> It doesn't mean that those 0.6% are or are not malnourished.
> >
> >Seems very likely that they are. Children starve a lot faster than
> >adults.
>
> The children who die of malnutrition in the USA are overwhelmingly
> victims of profound illness, generally birth defects. One rarely
> reads, say, of a lunatic parent who allows a child to die from lack of
> care. We have AFDC, food stamps, free meal centers, charities, and
> child protective agencies that look out for kids. Far more dangerous
> is being killed by trauma, overwhelmingly likely to be inflicted by a
> step-parent or other non-blood-relative.

Statistics? You've got a fair population suffering from "food
insecurity" for whom your welfare system - such as it is -doesn't work.

> But what is this obsession with US juvenile nutrition? It's a weird,
> recurrent theme.

What's really weird is that the richest country in the world has a
significant proportion of its population suffering from food
insecurity.

Your welfare system seems to be crippled for ideological reasons - you
want to starve people back to work, even when there isn't any work to
starve them back into. Your ideologues seems to be too stupid to
realise that starving families damages them - and is particularly
damaging to the kids, who are your next generation of workers.

In this context an effective welfare system fulfils the same function
as the oil-soaked paper I wrap around my tools after I've used them. so
that they will still be in good nick when I want to use them again.

-- 
Bill Sloman, Nijmegen


Article: 95367
Subject: Re: Reading user data from PROM
From: jaxatwork1@gmail.com
Date: 22 Jan 2006 19:22:22 -0800
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
AFAIR, it was Xapp694. If that's what you intend to do...


Article: 95368
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: bill.sloman@ieee.org
Date: 22 Jan 2006 19:30:45 -0800
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>

SioL wrote:
> <bill.sloman@ieee.org> wrote in message news:1137903985.757432.131050@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> > Don't argue with me - argue with
> > http://www.childinfo.org/areas/malnutrition/wasting.php
>
> There's nothing to argue about, Slovenia is not listed and neither is most
> of EU?!?!

The web site doesn't bother posting figures less than 0.1% and - as far
as I can work out - most of the EU hasn't got enough juvenile
malnutrition to register.

> > Former Yugoslavia is cleaning up after a nasty series of civil wars, so
> > it isn't surprising that your welfare system is in worse shape than the
> > U.S.A., but we can hope that you will be back up to the European norm -
> > no juvenile malnutrition (bar a few vicitims of lunatic parents) - in a
> > few more years. Romania is stll recovering from Ceausescu and we can
> > hope that they will do as well. The Czech Republic and Hungary are a
> > bit more puzzling. I'm worndering how much of their malnutrition is
> > confined to the Gypsy minority.
>
> I always thought you checked your sources very well, but apparently not so.
> I find that very dissapointing since you're always fiercely defending your views.

I'm sorry, but by the time I'd copied what seemed like every country in
former Yugoslavia from the list into my posting, I'd gotten horribly
bored, and I figured that the readers would too, so I collapsed them
into "former Yugoslavia".

I apologise for unintentionally traducing Slovenia. I hadn't realised
that your war had been so short and non-destructive.

> Slovenia is the only country from the Ex-Yugoslavia inside EU at the moment
> and as such the only one you can use in your comparisons, were we talking about EU.
> The only war that took place here lasted 10 days, yet you can hardly call that a war.
>
> I assure you, no malnutrition of children resulted from this 10-day incident which took
> place 15 years ago. Our BDP, if this has any bearing at all for malnutrition, is comparable
> to the other, admittedly among the less wealthy EU members I listed, such as Portugal.
> Besides, the culture of eating is very high here. There are far less McDonalds style chains
> here than in the NetherLands since they're not popular with people, for example Dairy Queen
> went belly up years ago.

Good for Slovenia! The Netherlands is acquiring a culture of eating
well - we now have three restaurants with three Michelin stars - but
there is a long way to go. It a Dutch person recommends a restaurant to
you, you can be fairly sure that the decor, ambience and service will
all be okay, but the food can be total rubbish.
 
-- 
Bill Sloman, Nijmegen


Article: 95369
Subject: Re: Modelsim problem
From: "=?iso-8859-1?q?Jaime_Andr=E9s_Aranguren_Cardona?=" <jaime.aranguren@gmail.com>
Date: 22 Jan 2006 19:46:39 -0800
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Thanks to all of you who replied. I played around a bit with the
subject, and finally could solve it. I had some problems with the
license environmental variable (WinXP Home). NOw runs flawlessly.

Regards,

JaaC


Article: 95370
Subject: Re: ISE BaseX customers
From: "Simon Peacock" <simon$actrix.co.nz>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 16:49:50 +1300
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
However .. you might now find the free webpack does everything you already
need :-)

Simon


"Antti Lukats" <antti@openchip.org> wrote in message
news:dqtejk$po9$1@online.de...
> "GaLaKtIkUsT" <taileb.mehdi@gmail.com> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> news:1137850540.152432.185310@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >I read from the file
> > http://www.xilinx.com/company/press/kits/ise81i/8_1i_faq.pdf the
> > following:
> >
> > --BEGIN--
> > 14. What happened to the ISE BaseX configuration?
> > .... skipped text ....
> > All in-maintenance ISE BaseX customers are receiving a copy of ISE
> > Foundation at no extra cost with the ISE 8.1i release.
> > --END--
> >
> > I'm an in maintenance BaseX customer. Does it mean that I can get full
> > ISE foundation?
> >
> > Mehdi.
> >
> YES, you should.
>
>



Article: 95371
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: "Simon Peacock" <simon$actrix.co.nz>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 17:15:32 +1300
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>

"Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:43D2A9B5.AE0515DD@hotmail.com...
>
>
> Steve at fivetrees wrote:
>
> > "Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:43D26733.4C03D13E@hotmail.com...
> > >
> > > Can someone here please advise me why there's this current hysteria
about
> > > bird
> > > flu ? I expect bird flu has existed since the dawn of time. What's so
> > > dangerous
> > > about it in 2005/6 ?
> > >
> > > I assume it's just media hype. They found something 'new' to worry us
> > > about.
> >
> > You might want to read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Flu_Epidemic
> >
> > "The Spanish Flu Pandemic, also known as La Grippe, or La Pesadilla, was
an
> > unusually severe and deadly strain of avian influenza, a viral
infectious
> > disease, that killed some 50 million to 100 million people worldwide
over
> > about a year in 1918 and 1919. It is thought to have been one of the
most
> > deadly pandemics so far in human history. It was caused by the H1N1 type
of
> > influenza virus, which is similar to bird flu of today, mainly H5N1 and
> > H5N2."
> >
> > Virii don't just "exist since the dawn of time". They mutate.
>
> I'm aware of the 1918/9 pandemic. What no-one seems to be able to answer
is the
> ' why panic *now* ? ' question.
>
> Nothing has changed significantly it seems.

And have you brought shares in the company making Tamiflu?  Could you ask
for a better marketing campaign?  The drug has only a certain shelf life,
and there's no guarantee that it will even work once their is an epidemic.
This way if it doesn't work, they don't have to refund anything, and in a
year if there's no outbreak, all the stock gets binned anyway as its expired
and governments have to restock :-)
This is the best sort of publicity any company could ask for and better
still, its governments spending hard cash, and even people :-)

Simon



Article: 95372
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: "Simon Peacock" <simon$actrix.co.nz>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 17:34:05 +1300
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>

"Bryan Hackney" <no@body.home> wrote in message
news:lkFAf.28166$v05.13131@tornado.texas.rr.com...
> Pooh Bear wrote:
> > Bryan Hackney wrote:
> >
> >
> >>As for Steyn, predictions are one thing. Can you refute any of his
> >>facts?
> >
> >
> > He has no facts. It's all in his mind.
> >
> > Graham
> >
>
> With such wit and surgical analysis, what is the need for
> trained seals?
>

They can balance a ball on their nose



Article: 95373
Subject: Re: The attributes specified to DCM instance doesnot get written to the .vm file
From: "Sudhir Shetty" <sudhirshettyk@gmail.com>
Date: 22 Jan 2006 20:48:39 -0800
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>
Hi ,
Thanks for the reply.
But when i use .vm file to do a simulation , i will need those
parameters in the .vm file .right ?

Thanks,
Sudhir

mk wrote:

> On 22 Jan 2006 08:03:53 -0800, "Sudhir Shetty"
> <sudhirshettyk@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >Hi ,
> >I create a instance of DCM as follows :
> >
> >DCM i_DCM (...
> >        ...
> >        ...
> >        ) /* synthesis xc_props ="DLL_FREQUENCY_MODE =
> >LOW,DUTY_CYCLE_CORRECTION = TRUE, <more parameters > */; //note this
> >directive is on a single line without line-breaks
> >
> >
> >But I see that in the post-synthesis .vm file there is no defparams
> >added for these attributes.
>
> That's normal as there is no tool which would need those parameters at
> that point. What's important is whether those parameters get written
> to the EDF file which goes into the PAR correctly and whether the
> Xilinx toolset uses the properly.


Article: 95374
Subject: Re: OT:Shooting Ourselves in the Foot
From: "Simon Peacock" <simon$actrix.co.nz>
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 18:00:01 +1300
Links: << >>  << T >>  << A >>

"Pooh Bear" <rabbitsfriendsandrelations@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:43D3B37D.97DD588@hotmail.com...
>
>
> SS wrote:
>
> > I'm from India and I think that this thread is rather interesting...
> >
> > Chris.Gammell@gmail.com wrote:
> > > I think the interesting thing in all of this is that the predominate
> > > language still used is English. I think that speaks volumes to the
> > > future of the industries. Until we have to start learning Mandarin or
> > > Hindi, we're in good shape.
> >
> > I don't think you ever will need to - Indian engineers predominantly
> > 'choose' to speak in English. However, the same cant be said for
> > whether they 'think' in English. I do, though :-)
>
> Possibly some posters are unaware that English is an official Indian
> language. Indeed, along with Hindi those 2 are the only Indian languages
> that aren't regional.
>
> Graham
>
One of the advantages, of course, is that all the computer languages are
English.. or at least American English.
Also if you want to get the big bucks.. you still have to move to the USA.
There also seems to be a trend of IT personal switching countries, and
English, for better or worse, is a fairly generic language.

Simon





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